San Bernandino

San Bernardino

San Bernardino suffered like the rest of LA after the quakes hit. It was spared any flooding
(although rumors persist of openings to the Deep Lacuna that appeared), but buildings and
infrastructure were destroyed. Faced with the massive task of rebuilding the city, the Pueblo
Corporate Council placed San Bernardino low on the priority list—after all, it had little corporate investment and was primarily home to lower-class citizens, and had a high population of the SINless. Residents quickly turned to the gangs and the criminal underworld for support, creating a cascading problem: as the crime rate (and SINless rate) increased, the PCC’s resources allocated to the area decreased. Decreasing amounts of water, power, and social services in the area forced even more residents to look to the gangs, a vicious circle that continues today.

Buildings are crumbling, and residents live with the knowledge that the next strong earthquake
could be the one to bring down their home or building. Water is strictly rationed, underground
utilities—disrupted by the quakes or disappeared altogether in the Deep Lacuna—are missing or
unreliable, wireless networks rely on mesh networks for service, and police and social services
are lacking or non-existent. Many residents fear that San Bernardino is destined to become LA’s
next “El Inferno” … and it looks like their fears are coming true.

San Bernandino

Like All Good Neighbors VonSteubing VonSteubing